Photo 7 Apr 56 notes

(Source: sciencefiction)

Video 26 Mar 1,029 notes

fastcompany:

The new Z-series suit is designed for walking on Mars, not simply floating around in space as astronauts have in the past. The space agency now wants your help to pick the final look.

via NASA.
Photo 18 Mar 2,491 notes distant-traveller:

The Antennae galaxies in collision

Two galaxies are squaring off in Corvus and here are the latest pictures. When two galaxies collide, the stars that compose them usually do not. That’s because galaxies are mostly empty space and, however bright, stars only take up only a small amount of that space. During the slow, hundred million year collision, one galaxy can still rip the other apart gravitationally, and dust and gas common to both galaxies does collide. In this clash of the titans, dark dust pillars mark massive molecular clouds are being compressed during the galactic encounter, causing the rapid birth of millions of stars, some of which are gravitationally bound together in massive star clusters.

Image credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA; Processing & Copyright: Davide Coverta

distant-traveller:

The Antennae galaxies in collision

Two galaxies are squaring off in Corvus and here are the latest pictures. When two galaxies collide, the stars that compose them usually do not. That’s because galaxies are mostly empty space and, however bright, stars only take up only a small amount of that space. During the slow, hundred million year collision, one galaxy can still rip the other apart gravitationally, and dust and gas common to both galaxies does collide. In this clash of the titans, dark dust pillars mark massive molecular clouds are being compressed during the galactic encounter, causing the rapid birth of millions of stars, some of which are gravitationally bound together in massive star clusters.

Image credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA; Processing & Copyright: Davide Coverta

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

Photo 9 Mar 121 notes

(Source: staggerlee13367)

Photo 9 Mar 334 notes phoenixdetermination:

rktovey:

Northern lights captured in space by NASA

…and the world wore a crown of light…..

phoenixdetermination:

rktovey:

Northern lights captured in space by NASA

…and the world wore a crown of light…..

Photo 16 Jan 5 notes wolfdancer:

Pictures of the year 2013: spaceAstro-photographer Robert Gendler has taken science data from the Hubble Space Telescope archive and combined it with his own ground-based observations to assemble this photo illustration of the magnificent spiral galaxy M106
Picture: NASA/R. Gendler/ESA/Hubble Her. / Rex Features

wolfdancer:

Pictures of the year 2013: space

Astro-photographer Robert Gendler has taken science data from the Hubble Space Telescope archive and combined it with his own ground-based observations to assemble this photo illustration of the magnificent spiral galaxy M106

Picture: NASA/R. Gendler/ESA/Hubble Her. / Rex Features

via wolfdancer.
Video 13 Jan 3,593 notes
via NASA.
Photo 12 Jan 12 notes ybb55:

Water in Orion Credit: Anglo-Australian Telescope photograph by David Malin Copyright: Anglo-Australian Telescope Board Explanation: Is Orion all wet? Recent observations have confirmed that water molecules now exist in the famous Orion Nebula, and are still forming. The Orion Nebula (M42, shown above) is known to be composed mostly of hydrogen gas, with all other atoms and molecules being comparatively rare. The nebula is so vast, though, that even the measured minuscule production rate creates enough water to fill Earth’s oceans 60 times over every day, speculate discoverers led by M. Harwit (Cornell). The water that composes comets, the oceans of Earth, and even humans may have been created in a cloud like the Orion Nebula.

ybb55:

Water in Orion Credit: Anglo-Australian Telescope photograph by David Malin Copyright: Anglo-Australian Telescope Board Explanation: Is Orion all wet? Recent observations have confirmed that water molecules now exist in the famous Orion Nebula, and are still forming. The Orion Nebula (M42, shown above) is known to be composed mostly of hydrogen gas, with all other atoms and molecules being comparatively rare. The nebula is so vast, though, that even the measured minuscule production rate creates enough water to fill Earth’s oceans 60 times over every day, speculate discoverers led by M. Harwit (Cornell). The water that composes comets, the oceans of Earth, and even humans may have been created in a cloud like the Orion Nebula.

Photo 10 Jan 839 notes kenobi-wan-obi:


Scale of Universe Measured with 1-Percent Accuracy

An ultraprecise new galaxy map is shedding light on the properties of dark energy, the mysterious force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.
Image: An artist’s concept of the latest, highly accurate measurement of the universe from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. The spheres show the current size of the “baryon acoustic oscillations” (BAOs) from the early universe, which have helped to set the distribution of galaxies that we see in the universe today. BAOs can be used as a “standard ruler” (white line) to measure the distances to all the galaxies in the universe. Credit: Zosia Rostomian, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
A team of researchers working with the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) has determined the distances to galaxies more than 6 billion light-years away to within 1 percent accuracy — an unprecedented measurement.
"There are not many things in our daily lives that we know to 1-percent accuracy," David Schlegel, a physicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the principal investigator of BOSS, said in a statement. "I now know the size of the universe better than I know the size of my house."

kenobi-wan-obi:

Scale of Universe Measured with 1-Percent Accuracy

An ultraprecise new galaxy map is shedding light on the properties of dark energy, the mysterious force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Image: An artist’s concept of the latest, highly accurate measurement of the universe from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. The spheres show the current size of the “baryon acoustic oscillations” (BAOs) from the early universe, which have helped to set the distribution of galaxies that we see in the universe today. BAOs can be used as a “standard ruler” (white line) to measure the distances to all the galaxies in the universe. Credit: Zosia Rostomian, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A team of researchers working with the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) has determined the distances to galaxies more than 6 billion light-years away to within 1 percent accuracy — an unprecedented measurement.

"There are not many things in our daily lives that we know to 1-percent accuracy," David Schlegel, a physicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the principal investigator of BOSS, said in a statement. "I now know the size of the universe better than I know the size of my house."

via NASA.
Photo 30 Dec 165 notes wolfdancer:

mandrag:

toineaunaturel: Europe by night; Europe pendant la nuit; Europa à noite

wolfdancer:- Ok Who left the lights on?  ;  )

wolfdancer:

mandrag:

toineaunaturel: Europe by night; Europe pendant la nuit; Europa à noite

wolfdancer:- Ok Who left the lights on?  ;  )

via wolfdancer.

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